Leaders must be on their best behaviour in a changing world

Julie Fowlie, UK


Objectives:

  • Discuss the results of a recent research project which analysed MBA student’s perceptions of the behaviours of “good” and “bad” leaders, mapping against Goleman’s framework of emotional intelligence competencies.
  • Explore how these behaviours made these individual “feel” in particular what behaviours had the most positive and negative impact.
  • Discuss the implications of these finding for leadership development programmes with a particular emphasis on managing change.

Abstract:

The findings from this research project will prove interesting for anyone involved in the development of managers/leaders in times of change.

The basic findings were as follows:

The majority of behaviours perceived as “bad” were located in the self management quadrant with descriptions such as “bully”, “lack of respect”, “mood swings, “selfish”, and “inconsistent” appearing most frequently.

These “bad” behaviours produced negative feelings with “angry”, “anxious”, “unsettled”, “depressed”, “frustrated”, and “de-motivated” appearing most frequently.

In contrast the vast majority of behaviours perceived as “good” were located in the relationship management quadrant with descriptions such as “empowerment”, “complementary”, “good communication skills”, “visionary”, “encouraging”, “charismatic”, inspirational” and “leading by example” appearing most frequently.

These “good” behaviours produced positive feeling with “wanting to do more than is expected”, “motivated”, “inspired”, ”loyal”, “valued”, “supported” and “confident” appearing most frequently.

Discussions centred on these finding will form the basis to review current and new leadership development programmes.

Speaker:

Julie Fowlie's professional background is in management development within the financial services sector, which involves facilitating change through objective analysis, team building and leadership.

Her approach is based on the premise that organisational goals are achieved if employees are recognised as holistic individuals whose experiences outside the workplace should and must be taken in account. She joined the University of Brighton, Business School in 1999 as a senior lecturer specialising in leadership, and emotional intelligence. In 2001 she completed a Masters Degree which considered the role of Emotional Intelligence in preparing students for employment.

She also acts as a freelance management development consultant.